More of My Favorite Boat Building Tools

In this second installment of my favorite boat building tools, I have brought out some power tools.

2016-06-05 11.54.18 (Medium)

The first is the Dewalt Corded TrackSaw (PN:DWS520K, $475.19, http://www.amazon.com)  In the August 2016 issue of Fine Woodworking, (http://www.finewoodworking.com), Mark Edmudson reviewed several track saws.  The track saws from Festool and Mafell were rated the best and the one from Makita as best value.  I have not used any track saw but the Dewalt and I have very happy with it.  I always brush dust off the track and the work piece before a cut and never had the track slip while cutting.  To avoid cutting the table or concrete I have two 4′ x 8′ sheets of 1-1/2 inch rigid foam insulation from Home Depot that I put the work piece on.  I use the track saw for any straight cut on sheet goods and long boards.  The saw was an unbeliever time saver when I was cutting out the molds, bulkhead and transom for my Candlefish 13.  I marked all the cut lines in red (so as not to cut a centerline or water line by mistake) on sheets of plywood and then cut all the parts out.  The pull the trigger then push down and forward to start the cut was not natural at first but now I don’t even think about it.

The second is the Rockwell Versacut (PN RK3440K, $99, http://www.homedepot.com)  The Versacut is a 3-3/8 inch circular saw and don’t let the name fool you; this is not a tool make by Rockwell of years ago.  This Rockwell Tools is Positec Tool Corporation in China, a supplier of OEM and second tier tools.  I originally bought this saw to remove particle board as part of installing hardwood floors.  I would use the bi-metal blade and cut the particle board into 1′ x 4′ pieces and then pry them out.  The small blade allowed me to steer around (most of) the nails holding the particle board down.  Now I use the Versacut with a carbide blade for cutting curves in plywood.  I used it to cut all the panels for my Candlefish 13.  The V notch in the saw base is not exactly where the blade cuts but a few practice cuts solves that problem.

Lastly there is my baby router, a Dewalt Compact Router (PN:DWP611, $122.99, http://www.amazon.com)  I mostly use the round over or a 45° chamfer bit.  The routers small size allows me to easily route a round over on canoe gunnels.  I used the 45° chamfer bit on the plywood panels before stitching the panels.  The router has 1-1/4 hp and comes with a 1/4 inch collet.  This router is more than a panel router but not a full size router; I would stick with small bits and leave the canoe bit to a full size router.

Comments are closed.